FanPost

Leaf of the Day - Jan 9-11, 2009 - George Armstrong

Jan 9-11, 2009 - George Armstrong

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Back when Vincent Damphousse was a rookie, the Leafs handed him #10.  A Gardens old-timer took it upon himself to talk to young Vincent about some of the great players who had worn that number in the past - Primeau, Apps, Armstrong in particular.  Vincent, out of Montreal, didn't know who they were.

When Armstrong himself was given #10, there was actually something of a handoff.  There are pictures around of Teeder Kennedy taking a #10 sweater from Syl Apps and handing it to young George.  The point was that getting this number was a big deal and you had to earn it.

George did well by it.  Conn Smythe called him the best captain he'd ever had, and given that he'd had ALL of them up to that point, that's pretty high praise.

George came out of northern Ontario in the late 1940s at the same time as a number of other Leaf prospects like Tod Sloan and Tim Horton.  He was a big scorer as a junior and did lead the Leafs in points a couple of times in the late 1950s.  George, though, was the prototypical Leaf forward - a team-first two-way player every bit as good in his own end as he was a scorer.  This helped him to a very long career in Toronto as he had that second skill-set to work with as the hands faded.

He's the last Leaf captain to retire without having ever played anywhere else, though he wasn't the captain in his last couple of seasons.  He passed that on to Keon.

He's also the goal-scorer in perhaps the most famous Leaf video clip of all - the empty net goal to seal the 1967 victory.

Brad May could do well by #10, but it would be nice if they still made people earn the right to wear it first.  Of all the numbers that deserve a patch on the current bearer's sleeve, #10 might be on top of the list (honourable mention to 7, 9, 27)

George gets his number:

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via www.legendsofhockey.net




George's stats:

 

1946-47 Copper Cliff Jr. Redmen NOJHA 9 6 5 11 4 5 0 1 1 10
1947-48 Stratford Kroehlers OHA-Jr. 36 33 40 73 33 2 1 0 1 6
1948-49 Toronto Marlboros OHA-Jr. 39 29 33 62 89 10 7 10 17 2
1948-49 Toronto Marlboros OHA-Sr. 3 0 0 0 2
1948-49 Toronto Marlboros Al-Cup 10 2 5 7 6
1949-50 Toronto Marlboros OHA-Sr. 45 64 51 115 74 3 0 0 0 0
1949-50 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 2 0 0 0 0
1949-50 Toronto Marlboros Al-Cup 17 19 19 38 18
1950-51 Pittsburgh Hornets AHL 71 15 33 48 49 13 4 9 13 6
1951-52 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 20 3 3 6 30 4 0 0 0 2
1951-52 Pittsburgh Hornets AHL 50 30 29 59 62
1952-53 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 52 14 11 25 54
1953-54 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 63 17 15 32 60 5 1 0 1 2
1954-55 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 66 10 18 28 80 4 1 0 1 4
1955-56 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 67 16 32 48 97 5 4 2 6 0
1956-57 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 54 18 26 44 37
1957-58 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 59 17 25 42 93
1958-59 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 59 20 16 36 37 12 0 4 4 10
1959-60 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 70 23 28 51 60 10 1 4 5 4
1960-61 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 47 14 19 33 21 5 1 1 2 0
1961-62 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 70 21 32 53 27 12 7 5 12 2
1962-63 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 70 19 24 43 27 10 3 6 9 4
1963-64 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 66 20 17 37 14 14 5 8 13 10
1964-65 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 59 15 22 37 14 6 1 0 1 4
1965-66 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 70 16 35 51 12 4 0 1 1 4
1966-67 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 70 9 24 33 26 9 2 1 3 6
1967-68 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 62 13 21 34 4 8
1968-69 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 53 11 16 27 10 -9 4 0 0 0 0
1969-70 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 49 13 15 28 12 9
1970-71 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 59 7 18 25 6 7 6 0 2 2 0
NHL/Leaf Totals 1187 296 417 713 721 110 26 34 60 52



George's famous goal:



the HHOF take on George:

George "Chief" Armstrong spent his childhood in the small town of Falconbridge, near Sudbury, Ontario. He was born of Irish-Algonquin heritage and his father worked in the nickel mines of Sudbury while young George worked at improving his hockey skills at the local rink. The Toronto Maple Leafs put Armstrong on their protected list while he was playing with the Copper Cliff Jr. Redmen of the NOHA in 1946-47. The following season, when the Leafs Junior A affiliate in Stratford needed an additional player, Armstrong was assigned to go. He promptly led the league in scoring with 73 points in 36 games and won the most valuable player award. The Maple Leafs wasted no time in re-assigning him to their main junior affiliate, the Toronto Marlboros of the OHA, for the 1948-49 season.

Armstrong was moved up to the senior Marlies in time for the 1949 Allan Cup playdowns and stayed with the club on a full time basis for the 1949-50 season. He registered 64 goals in 45 games and a further 19 goals in 17 Allan Cup playdown games as the Marlboros captured the 1950 Canadian senior hockey championship. It was during the Allan Cup tournament that the Marlies visited the Stoney Indian Reserve in Alberta. When the band heard of Armstrong ancestral background they dubbed him Big Chief Shoot the Puck and presented him with a ceremonial headdress.

He played the majority of his first two pro seasons with the Leafs' AHL farm team in Pittsburgh before making the big club for good at the start of the 1952-53 season. Armstrong was never a great skater but was rarely out of position; he knew how to play the angles on the opposing forwards and was a great corner man in the offensive zone. He never attained the scoring heights in the NHL as he had in his junior and senior days but Armstrong brought determination, leadership, and humour to a Leafs squad that was trying to escape the shadow of the Barilko tragedy in the early 1950s.

Armstrong was named as captain of the Leafs to start the 1957-58 season and was called by Conn Smythe "the best captain, as a captain, the Leafs have ever had." Smythe later honoured his captain by naming one of his horses Big Chief Army, something Smythe had done on only two other occasions for Charlie Conacher and Jean Beliveau.

After his retirement, Armstrong coached the Toronto Marlboros to Memorial Cup victories in 1972-73 and 1974-75 before accepting a scouting position with the Quebec Nordiques in 1978. Armstrong was with the Nordiques for nine years before returning to Toronto as assistant general manager and scout in 1988. His first year back was an eventful one and Armstrong found himself in the uncomfortable role as interim replacement coach for the final 47 games of the 1988-89 season. By the next year he had returned to his preferred role as a scout for the organization, primarily covering the Ontario Hockey League in the Toronto area.

George Armstrong was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1975.



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via img265.imageshack.us


 

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