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Frederik Andersen is now a graduate of the Kadri school of embellishment

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It’s not that’s it’s diving, it’s that he overacted.

2016 NHL Awards - Red Carpet
This is the photo that came up when I searched Andersen and Vegas.
Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Frederik Andersen has been fined $2,000 for his second embellishment infraction of the season.

So this kind of fine is for embellishment, let’s get that straight off the drop. Just because it’s commonly referred to as diving, does not mean the infraction is just for faking when no offence occurred. So the issue isn’t that he wasn’t tripped on this play, it’s that he overacted — embellished — the effects. And, yeah, he pretty much did.

Why is that bad? Because it makes a mockery of the officials. It says that you won’t call a trip unless I oversell the flailing arm and the full-body splat. And people in charge of handing out tripping penalties don’t like being mocked. Even when it’s at least partly valid criticism of the way they do their job.

This is exactly the sort of thing Nazem Kadri used to do. And he’s stopped doing it, mostly, and while I don’t think a reputation for “diving” should influence the refs in making calls, they’re people, and they like to have their power acknowledged.

As for the fine? Well, I’m sure that suit up there cost more than two grand, so I’m not sure it’s much of a deterrent.

I do not remember any incident in that game, but if you find a reference to it, speak up!

Update! In the broadcast of the Leafs-Sharks game, the Sportsnet intermission standup bit said the Leafs talked about this incident with Andersen and there is no doubt is was embellishment. So there you are.